Are increased levels of self-reported psychosocial stress, anxiety, and depression associated with fecundity?

Self-reported psychosocial stress, anxiety, and depression were not associated with fecundity. Any adverse effect of stress or psychological disturbance does not appear to be detectable via the questionnaires administered.

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Authors

Courtney D. Lynch, Ph.D., M.P.H., Rajeshwari Sundaram, Ph.D., Germaine M. Buck Louis, Ph.D., M.S., Kirsten J. Lum, M.S.E., Cecilia Pyper, M.B.B.S.

Vol 98, Issue 2 , Pages 453-458

Abstract

Objective:

To assess the association between self-reported measures of stress, anxiety, depression, and related constructs and fecundity.

Design:

Prospective cohort study of women trying to conceive.

Setting:

United Kingdom.

Patient(s):

Three hundred thirty-nine women aged 18–40 years who were attempting to conceive.

Intervention(s):

Completed daily diaries for up to six cycles or until pregnancy was detected. For each cycle, stress biomarkers were measured and psychosocial questionnaires were completed.

Main Outcome Measures(s):

Fecundability odds ratios (FORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using discrete time survival methods, and the day-specific probabilities of pregnancy were calculated using Bayesian statistical techniques.

Result(s):

Among the 339 women, 207 (61%) became pregnant during the study, 69 (20%) did not become pregnant, and 63 (19%) withdrew. After controlling for maternal age, parity, months trying to conceive before enrollment, smoking, caffeine use, and frequency of intercourse, we found no association between most psychosocial measures and FORs or the day-specific probabilities of pregnancy save for an increased FOR for women reporting higher versus lower levels of social support.

Conclusion(s):

Self-reported psychosocial stress, anxiety, and depression were not associated with fecundity. Any adverse effect of stress or psychological disturbance on fecundity does not appear to be detectable via the questionnaires administered.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)00572-9/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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