Assisted conception does not increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus, compared with natural conception: a prospective cohort study

Assisted conception does not increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus com- pared with natural conception.

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Volume 111, Issue 2, Pages 348–356

Authors:

Rui Nie, Ph.D., Mingyue Wang, M.Med., Tantan Liao, M.Med., Kun Qian, Ph.D., Guijin Zhu, M.Med., Lei Jin, Ph.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To determine whether assisted conception increases the risk for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection compared with natural conception.

Design

Prospective cohort study.

Setting

Research laboratory.

Patient(s)

A total of 305 children, 176 born with assisted conception and 129 born with natural conception, were born to a total of 251 hepatitis B surface antigen– (HBsAg-) positive women.

Intervention(s)

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s)

The seropositive rates of HBsAg in children at birth and HBV infection rates at 9–15 months of age.

Result(s)

Overall, 7.5% (23/305) of children were HBsAg-positive at birth. The rate of HBsAg-positive children at birth did not significantly differ between children in the assisted conception group compared with those in the natural conception group (6.3% [11/176] vs. 9.3% [12/129]). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that conception method is not related to the rate of HBsAg-positive children at birth. All children who were positive for HBsAg at birth and were followed up for 9–15 months became negative for HBsAg after hepatitis B immunization.

Conclusion(s)

Assisted conception does not increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of HBV compared with natural conception.


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Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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