Impact factor 2.0: a name can be everything

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Volume 110, Issue 1, Pages 25–26

Authors:

David R. Meldrum, M.D.

Abstract:

The impact factor (IF 1.0) hasn't been updated in the more than six decades since it was first suggested in 1955. Today there is a broad consensus that it is an inaccurate and misleading indicator for its intended purpose to rank journal quality. This Inklings argues for a long overdue update to IF 2.0 by using existing calculations and a simple conversion to familiar digits.


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Go to the profile of Fertility and Sterility

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

1 Comments

Go to the profile of Andre Hazout
Andre Hazout 9 days ago

Why not to say so loudly what newspaper readers think in a whisper. Great scientists whose mother language is not English prepare very carefully articles that are ultimately rejected by publishers for obscure reasons, while others from nations including members of editorial boards come from, are accepted even when they bring little to the scientific debate.
In addition, the publishing times are long and, indeed, many authors, of quality, publish in recent sites and indexed but badly evaluated.
Fertility and Fertility is, from my point of view, a good journal of reference but the choice of articles to publish is to reconsider. So far, the plethora of sites "open access" will not diminish and it is therefore a real reflection about the journal policy that must be conducted.