Using pneumovaginoscopy to perform the removal of a vaginal fibroid

Pneumovaginoscopy is a novel technique that can be performed for vaginal pathologies with the same device used for transvaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. We described this technique and assessed its feasibility.
Using pneumovaginoscopy to perform the removal of a vaginal fibroid

VOLUME 116, ISSUE 6, P1664-1666

Authors:

Maud Allary, Aubert Agostini, M.D., Lisa Calderon, M.D., Laura Miquel, M.D., Patrice Crochet, Ph.D., Antoine Netter, M.D. 

Abstract:

Objective

To describe and assess the feasibility of a novel surgical technique (pneumovaginoscopy) for performing vaginal surgery.


Design

Video of a single surgical procedure.


Setting

A university hospital.


Patient(s)

A 42-year-old woman, gravida 2 para 2, presented with chronic pelvic pain. Vaginal examination revealed a 4-cm spherical mass bulging through her posterior vaginal wall. Magnetic resonance imaging identified this mass as either a subserosal pedunculated uterine fibroid (type 7 according to the FIGO classification) or an ectopic fibroid of the posterior vaginal wall (type 8).


Intervention(s)

The whole procedure was performed using pneumovaginoscopy. The GelPOINT V-Path (Applied Medical, Rancho Santa Margarita, California) which is the device most often used to perform transvaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgical procedures, was introduced into the vagina to create a pneumovagina. Monopolar scissors were used to create an incision through the posterior vaginal wall to reach the fibroid. Myomectomy was performed using traction movements of the fibroid associated with the dissection of the capsule. The absence of a uterine pedicle at the end of the myomectomy was in favor of an ectopic fibroid of the vagina (type 8 of the FIGO classification). The vaginal defect was closed with interrupted sutures using the access points on the GelPOINT.


Main outcome measure(s)

The procedure was easily and efficiently performed using the pneumovaginoscopy technique and lasted less than an hour. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1 without any postoperative complications. She was symptom-free at her 2-month postoperative visit.


Result(s)

Compared to the classical vaginal approach, pneumovaginoscopy improves visualization through targeted lighting and close-up vision. This technique is particularly interesting in cases where the vaginal opening is narrow and for lesions located in the upper half of the vagina. Because of the unusual expansion of the vagina, increased caution is required to avoid bladder or rectal injuries.


Conclusion(s)

Pneumovaginoscopy is a novel technique that can be performed for vaginal pathologies with the same device used for transvaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. We described this technique and assessed its feasibility.