Retro cervical tunneling to ensure correct placement for robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage

The development of a retro cervical pocket during robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage may be performed safely and effectively. It may help prevent displacement of the Mersilene tape during endoscopic knotting.

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VOLUME 116, ISSUE 4, P1195-1196

Authors:

Elena Suárez-Salvador, Ph.D., Maria Goya, Ph.D., Ursula Acosta, M.D., Mireia Vargas, M.D., Melissa Bradbury, Ph.D., Elena Carreras, Ph.D., Antonio Gil-Moreno, Ph.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To demonstrate the step-by-step surgical technique of robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage, highlighting a new posterior compartment approach.


Design

Stepwise explanation of a surgical technique using surgical video.


Setting

The procedure was performed at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron in Barcelona, Spain, a tertiary medical center. The local institutional review board considers that case reports are exempt from research approval.


Patient(s)

A 26-year-old non-pregnant patient, with a history of cervical incompetence, three second-trimester losses, and vaginal cerclage failure during her previous pregnancy.


Intervention(s)

Robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage placement was performed. An 8-mm, 30° scope; monopolar scissors; and Maryland bipolar graspers were used. A uterine manipulator was used for better exposure. First, a bladder flap was created, and the uterine vessels were identified and skeletonized. Next, a window between the uterine vessels and the uterine cervix at the level of the cervical-isthmic junction was created bilaterally. At the posterior compartment, the dissection of the root of the uterosacral ligaments was carefully performed. A retrocervical pocket was created with monopolar scissors and sharp dissection. The procedure was finished with the Mersilene tape placement. First, the tape was passed through the window created in the right broad ligament, with a posterior-to-anterior direction, the retro cervical pocket, and finally through the left broad ligament. The knot was placed anteriorly and reperitonization was performed. In addition to this operation, robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage was successfully performed in another six patients with good surgical and obstetrics outcomes.


Main outcome measure(s)

Intraoperative technique to ensure successful robot-assisted abdominal cerclage placement.


Result(s)

The patient became pregnant six months following the robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage. Her pregnancy was closely followed up at the High-Risk Obstetric Unit, and she had no complications during pregnancy. An elective cesarean section was performed at 36 weeks with a healthy newborn baby that was discharged with the mother three days after delivery.


Conclusion(s)

The development of a retro cervical pocket during robotic-assisted transabdominal cerclage can be performed safely and effectively. It may help prevent displacement of the Mersilene tape during endoscopic knotting.

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders.