Racial differences in anxiety, depression, and quality of life in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

Mental Health

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VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2, P230-237, JUNE 01, 2021

Authors:

Snigdha Alur-Gupta, M.D., M.S.C.E., Iris Lee, M.D., Anat Chemerinski, M.D., Chang Liu, B.A., Jenna Lipson, M.D., Kelly Allison, Ph.D., Robert Gallop, Ph.D., Anuja Dokras, M.D., Ph.D

Abstract:

Objective

To evaluate racial differences in the anxiety and depression prevalence and scores in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).


Design

Cross-sectional.


Setting

Academic institution.


Patient(s)

Reproductive-aged women with PCOS (n = 272) and controls (n = 295).


Intervention(s)

Hospital anxiety and depression scale and modified PCOS quality-of-life survey (MPCOS-Q).


Main Outcome Measure(s)

Differences in depression and anxiety scores and quality-of-life score measured using the hospital anxiety and depression scale and MPCOS-Q were determined between White and Black women with PCOS. Multivariable correlation regressions assessed the association of the Ferriman-Gallwey score, total testosterone, body mass index (BMI), and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance with anxiety, depression, and quality-of-life scores.


Result(s)

Multivariable regression controlling for age, BMI, and socioeconomic status showed that White women with PCOS had a significantly higher prevalence of anxiety than Black women with PCOS (75.9% vs. 61.3%) and significantly higher anxiety scores (mean ± SD, 10.3 ± 4.1 vs. 8.7 ± 4.6). The prevalence of depression (24.4% vs. 29%) and depression scores (4.8 ± 3.6 vs. 5.1 ± 4.0) was not significantly different. In multivariable correlation regressions, the interaction between BMI and race in its association with anxiety scores was significant. The association of race with Ferriman-Gallwey score, total testosterone, or homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance was not significant. In multivariable models, although the total MPCOS-Q scores were similar, the infertility domain was significantly lower in Black women with PCOS (mean ± SD, 12.6 ± 7.8 vs. 17.5 ± 6.8) indicating a lower quality of life related to infertility.


Conclusion

Racial differences identified in the prevalence of anxiety and MPCOS-Q domains suggest the importance of routine screening and provide an opportunity for targeted interventions based on race.

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders.