Effect of paternal body mass index on neonatal outcomes of singletons after frozen−thawed embryo transfer cycles: analysis of 7,908 singleton newborns

Paternal BMI have an impact on birthweight of single- tons after FET cycles independently. Paternal over- weight and obesity were independent risk factors for having LGA infants after FET cycles.

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Volume 113, Issue 6, Pages 1215–1223.e1

Authors:

Meng Ma, M.D., Wei Zhang, M.D., Jie Zhang, Ph.D., Zhou Liang, M.D., Yanping Kuang, M.D., Yun Wang, M.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To investigate the effect of paternal body mass index (BMI) on neonatal outcomes of singletons after frozen−thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles.

Design

Retrospective cohort study.

Setting

Tertiary-care academic medical center.

Patient(s)

A total of 7,908 singleton newborns were divided into four categories based on their paternal BMI: 284 (3.6%) infants were in the paternal underweight category, 4,678 (59.2%) infants were in the paternal normal weight category, 2,585 (32.7%) infants were in the paternal overweight category, and 361 (4.6%) infants were in the paternal obesity category. In addition, we included only infants of women with normal BMI (18.5 kg/m2 ≤ BMI < 25 kg/m2).

Intervention(s)

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s)

Neonatal outcomes.

Result(s)

The rates of large for gestational age (LGA) infants were significantly higher among those in the paternal overweight and obesity categories than those in the paternal underweight categories. The rates of very LGA were higher among infants in the paternal overweight categories and lower among infants in the paternal underweight categories than the rates in normal controls. The rates of fetal macrosomia were higher among infants in the paternal overweight categories than among infants in the paternal normal weight categories. Compared with normal controls, Z-scores (gestational age- and sex-adjusted birthweight) were significantly higher among the infants in the paternal overweight and paternal obesity categories and significantly lower among the infants in the paternal underweight categories. A positive association was observed in a multiple linear regression model between paternal BMI and newborn birthweights after adjustment for several potential confounders.

Conclusion(s)

Paternal BMI had an independent impact on the birthweight of singletons born after FET cycles. Paternal overweight and paternal obesity were independent risk factors for having LGA infants after FET cycles. Furthermore, paternal overweight was an independent risk factor for fathering infants with macrosomia or very LGA infants after FET cycles.

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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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