Effect of body mass index on intrauterine insemination cycle success

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Authors:

Rachel M. Whynott, M.D., Karen M. Summers, M.P.H., Bradley J. Van Voorhis, M.D., Rachel B. Mejia, D.O.

Abstract:

Objective

To determine whether body mass index (BMI) affects intrauterine insemination treatment success.


Design

Retrospective cohort study.


Setting

Academic medical center.


Patient(s)

A total of 3,217 intrauterine insemination treatment cycles in 1,306 patients.


Intervention(s)

None.


Main Outcome Measure(s)

Primary outcome was live birth rate stratified by BMI. Secondary outcomes included rates of clinical pregnancy (defined as an intrauterine pregnancy with a heartbeat present on ultrasound), multiple gestation, biochemical pregnancy, missed abortion, ectopic, and spontaneous abortion.


Result(s)

Women with BMI 25 to 29.99 kg/m2 or ≥30 kg/m2 were equally likely to have a live birth as women of normal BMI. Women with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 did have a higher likelihood of biochemical pregnancy than women with normal BMI.


Conclusion(s)

A BMI between 25 and 29.99 kg/m2 or ≥30 kg/m2 does not appear to have a negative effect on live birth after intrauterine insemination. Obesity may be associated with a higher risk of biochemical pregnancy after intrauterine insemination.

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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