Diminished ovarian reserve is associated with reduced euploid rates via preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy independently from age: evidence for concomitant reduction in oocyte quality with quantity

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Authors:

Eleni Greenwood Jaswa, M.D., M.Sc., Charles E. McCulloch, Ph.D., Rhodel Simbulan, M.S., Marcelle I. Cedars, M.D., Mitchell P. Rosen, M.D., H.C.L.D.

Abstract:

Objective(s)

To determine whether women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) (quantitatively) had lower rates of euploid blastocysts, as a proxy for oocyte quality.


Design

Retrospective cohort study.


Setting

University reproductive health clinic.


Patient(s)

A total of 1,152 women aged 19–42 years underwent 1,675 IVF cycles yielding 8,073 blastocysts for biopsy from 2010 to 2019.


Interventions(s)

Preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy.


Main Outcome Measure(s)

Euploid rates, defined as the number of euploid blastocysts divided by the number of biopsied blastocysts per cycle.


Result(s)

A total of 225 women (20%) had DOR as infertility diagnosis per the Bologna criteria. Age was higher among the women with DOR (39.5 y vs. 37.0 y). Euploid rates were lower among women with vs. without DOR (29.0% vs. 44.9%). In generalized linear models controlling for age, women with DOR had 24% reduced odds of a biopsied blastocyst being euploid versus women without DOR. In a secondary analysis assigning DOR status to women producing the lowest quartile of age-adjusted mature oocyte yield, this relationship remained. No differences were identified in live birth rates between women with and without DOR after euploid single-embryo transfer independently from age (n = 944 transfers; 56.8% vs. 54.8%, respectively).


Conclusion(s)

Blastocysts from women with DOR are less likely to be euploid than those from women without DOR after adjustment for age. Given the concomitant reduction in euploid rates with quantity of oocytes observed in this study, quantitative ovarian reserve assessments (i.e., follicular machinery) may yield insight into relative ovarian aging.

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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