Development of an emergency plan for in vitro fertilization programs: a committee opinion

All IVF programs and clinics should have a plan to protect all specimens and provide contingencies for continuation or cessation of patient care following an emergency or natural disaster.

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VOLUME 115, ISSUE 4, P870-873

Authors:

Practice Committees of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, and the Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists

Abstract:

All in vitro fertilization programs and clinics should have a plan to protect fresh and cryopreserved human specimens (embryos, oocytes, sperm) and to provide contingencies for continuation or cessation of patient care in the event of an emergency or natural disaster. This document replaces the document titled “Recommendations for development of an emergency plan for in vitro fertilization programs: a committee opinion,” last published in 2016 (Fertil Steril 2016;105:e11–3).

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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.