Predictive value of maternal serum human chorionic gonadotropin levels in pregnancies achieved by in vitro fertilization with single cleavage and single blastocyst embryo transfers

Mean human chorionic gonadotropin levels resulting from a single fresh blastocyst transfer were significantly higher than those from a single cleavage transfer after adjusting for confounding variables.

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Authors

Galia Oron, M.D., Efrat Esh-Broder, M.D., Weon-Young Son, Ph.D., Hananel Holzer, M.D., Togas Tulandi, M.D., M.H.C.M.

Volume 103, Issue 6, Pages 1526-1531

Abstract

Objective:

To compare serum hCG levels after transfer of a single fresh cleavage embryo and of a single fresh blastocyst embryo and to determine the predictive value of serum hCG levels for pregnancy outcomes.

Design:

A single center retrospective cohort study.

Setting:

Tertiary university health center.

Patient(s):

All fresh single ETs between December 2008 and December 2013.

Intervention(s):

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Mean serum hCG levels on day 16 after oocyte collection, after the transfer of a fresh single cleavage embryo and a fresh single blastocyst embryo were compared. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to determine the association of potential factors on hCG value and a clinical pregnancy.

Result(s):

One thousand twenty-six fresh single ETs were analyzed, 801 (638 pregnancies) from a single blastocyst transfer and 225 (167 pregnancies) from a single cleavage ET. The mean hCG levels resulting from a single fresh blastocyst transfer (299 ± 204 IU/L) were significantly higher than those from a cleavage transfer (245 ± 204 IU/L). This difference remained after adjusting for confounding variables. The threshold value predicting a clinical pregnancy for a cleavage embryo was 100 IU/L, and for a blastocyst transfer, 133 IU/L.

Conclusion(s):

Our study suggests that initial serum hCG values are higher after the transfer of a single fresh blastocyst embryo compared with after a single fresh cleavage ET, even after adjusting for confounding variables.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(15)00158-2/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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