Female fertility preservation: innovations and questions

Preserving the potential of becoming genetic mother should now be part of the management of infants, adolescents, and young women at risk for infertility from benign or malignant diseases.

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Authors

René Frydman, M.D., Ph.D., Michaël Grynberg, M.D., Ph.D.

Volume 105, Issue 1, Pages 4-5

Abstract

Oocyte and ovarian tissue cryopreservation represents one of the most important advances in the field of reproductive medicine and biology. Preserving a woman’s potential for becoming a genetic mother is now possible for numerous diseases that could impair female fertility either by themselves or as a result of their treatment. However, female fertility preservation is still at the pioneering level and is thus often considered an experimental treatment either from a technical standpoint or in the clinical situation in which it is discussed. As a consequence, many ethics issues are raised with fertility preservation treatment in infants, adolescents, and young women.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(15)02046-4/fulltext

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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