Whether sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation has an effect on pregnancy and miscarriage after in vitro fertilization intracytoplasmic sperm injection A systematic review and metaanalysis

This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that high sperm DNA fragmentation was related to lower pregnancy rates in IVF but not in ICSI cycles, whereas it was associated to higher miscarriage rates in both IVF and ICSI cycles.

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Authors

Jing Zhao, M.D., Qiong Zhang, M.D., Yonggang Wang, M.D., Yanping Li, M.D.

Volume 102, Issue 4, Pages 998-1005

Abstract

Objective:

To examine whether sperm DNA fragmentation has an effect on pregnancy and miscarriage after IVF and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

Design:

Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Setting:

University-affiliated teaching hospital.

Patient(s):

Infertility patient(s).

Intervention(s):

An exhaustive electronic literature search was conducted on MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library, from database inception to October 2013. We included clinical trials that examined the influence of sperm DNA damage on pregnancy and miscarriage of IVF/ICSI.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

The outcomes of interest were pregnancy rate and miscarriage rate.

Result(s):

In the analysis of pregnancy, 16 cohort studies (3,106 couples) were included. Of these, 14 studies (2,756 couples, 965 pregnancies) that also mentioned miscarriage were identified in the analysis of miscarriage. Meta-analysis showed that high-level sperm DNA fragmentation has a detrimental effect on outcome of IVF/ICSI, with decreased pregnancy rate and increased miscarriage rate. The stratified analysis by type of procedure (IVF vs. ICSI) indicated that high sperm DNA damage was related to lower pregnancy rates in IVF but not in ICSI cycles, whereas it was associated with higher miscarriage rates in both IVF and ICSI cycles.

Conclusion(s):

The results indicate that assays detecting sperm DNA damage should be recommended to those suffering from recurrent failure to achieve pregnancy. Selection of sperm without DNA damage for use may improve the clinical outcome of ART. The data also provide a rationale for conducting further research aimed at evaluating the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for the detrimental effect of high sperm DNA fragmentation and the potential therapy.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00579-2/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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