Advocating for longitudinal follow up of the health and welfare of egg donors

Egg donation continues to increase in popularity as part of assisted reproduction. Although short-term health effects of donation have been well studied, many unanswered questions remain about the long-term medical and psychological consequences for women who donate eggs. Studies of longer-term postdonation health effects have significant limitations, and are often retrospective, cross-sectional, or case studies.

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Authors

Molly Woodriff, B.A., Mark V. Sauer, M.D., Robert Klitzman, M.D.

Volume 102, Issue 3, Pages 662-666

Abstract

Egg donation continues to increase in popularity as part of assisted reproduction. Although short-term health effects of donation have been well studied, many unanswered questions remain about the long-term medical and psychological consequences for women who donate eggs. Studies of longer-term postdonation health effects have significant limitations, and are often retrospective, cross-sectional, or case studies.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00500-7/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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