On label and off label drugs used in the treatment of male infertility

Male factor infertility is the cause of infertility in 50% of infertile couples. This manuscript reviews the commonly used off-label medications used to treat idiopathic male factor infertility: clomiphene citrate, letrozole/anastrozole, exogenous androgens, and pentoxifylline.

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Authors

Mahmoud Chehab, M.D., Alosh Madala, M.D., J.C. Trussell, M.D.

Volume 103, Issue 3, Pages 595-604

Abstract

Infertility affects 6.1 million U.S. couples—representing 10% of reproductive-age adults and 15% of all couples trying to conceive. Half of the time, infertility is the result of an abnormal semen analysis or other male factors, with 40%–50% of these infertile men diagnosed with idiopathic or nonclassifiable infertility. While the role of hormone therapy for men with an identified abnormality is well defined, the literature remains inconclusive and controversial regarding hormone manipulation using empirical (off-label) medical therapies for men with idiopathic infertility. This manuscript reviews the commonly used off-label medications used to treat idiopathic male factor infertility: clomiphene citrate, letrozole/anastrozole, exogenous androgens, and pentoxifylline.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)02553-9/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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