Metabolic profile of the different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome in two Latin American populations

The phenotype distribution and metabolic characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome differ in Chile and Argentina; the former is more metabolically altered and the latter more hypertensive.

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Authors

Amanda Ladrón de Guevara, M.D., Carolina Fux-Otta, Ph.D., M.D., Crisosto Nicolás, Ph.D., M.D., Paula Szafryk de Mereshian, Ph.D., M.D., Bárbara Echiburú, Ph.D., Gabriel Iraci, M.D., Francisco Perez-Bravo, Ph.D., Teresa Sir-Petermann, Ph.D., M.D.

Volume 101, Issue 6, Pages 1732–1739.e2

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the metabolic profile of Chilean and Argentinian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) according to the Rotterdam criteria.

Design:

Observational cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Academic centers.

Patient(s):

Women with PCOS, aged 18–39 years: 220 Chilean (PCOSCh) and 206 Argentinian (PCOSAr).

Intervention(s):

Physical examination, fasting blood samples for androgens, gonadotropins, metabolic parameters, and a transvaginal ultrasound.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Comparative analysis of the metabolic profile in both populations divided into four phenotypes.

Result(s):

The distribution of the different phenotypes was different in both populations. PCOSCh women showed a higher body mass index and a higher percentage of metabolic syndrome in all phenotypes compared with the PCOSAr women. The PCOSAr women exhibited a statistically significantly higher diastolic blood pressure in phenotypes A, B, and C and a higher percentage of hypertension in phenotypes A and D compared with the PCOSCh women.

Conclusion(s):

The data show differences in the metabolic profile of both populations. PCOSCh women presented with greater metabolic alterations such as dysglycemia and dyslipidemia and a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome, independent of the phenotype. The PCOSAr patients showed more elevated blood pressure. Ethnic diversity associated with environmental factors are fundamental elements in the analysis of the PCOS phenotypes.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00173-3/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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