Responding to change in reproductive endocrinology fellowships

Thirty years ago, the reproductive endocrinology field looked far different than it does today.

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Authors

William David Schlaff, M.D.

Volume 101, Issue 6, Pages 1510–1511

Abstract

Thirty years ago, in the days when I was a reproductive endocrinology fellow, the field looked far different than it does today. Reproductive endocrinologists at that time were most assuredly the experts in diagnosing and treating infertility, but were often, if not usually, the go-to doctors for patients with congenital uterovaginal anomalies, endometriosis, and those in need of complicated endoscopic procedures. The reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialist (REI) was not only the authority on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and other hormonal problems, but often the leader in addressing clinical issues in contraception, abnormal uterine bleeding, and menopause.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00255-6/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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