Prevalence of androgenic alopecia in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and characterization of associated clinical and biochemical features

Androgenic alopecia is prevalent in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and is associated with other manifestations of clinical hyperandrogenism, but not with greater risk of biochemical or metabolic abnormalities than with PCOS alone.

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Authors

Molly Quinn, M.D., Kanade Shinkai, M.D., Lauri Pasch, Ph.D., Lili Kuzmich, M.S., Marcelle Cedars, M.D., Heather Huddleston, M.D.

Volume 101, Issue 4, Pages 1129-1134

Abstract

Objective:

To describe the prevalence of androgenic alopecia (AGA) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to characterize associated clinical and biochemical features.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Multidisciplinary PCOS clinic at a tertiary academic center.

Patient(s):

A total of 254 women with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria were systematically examined from 2007 to 2012 by a reproductive endocrinologist, a dermatologist, and a psychologist.

Intervention(s):

Comprehensive dermatologic exams, ultrasonic imaging, serum testing, and Beck Depression Inventory Fast Screen (BDI-FS).

Main Outcome Measures:

Presence of AGA, acne, hirsutism, biochemical hyperandrogenemia, metabolic dysfunction, and clinical depression.

Result(s):

Fifty-six of 254 patients with PCOS (22.0%) had AGA. Subjects with PCOS and AGA were more likely to have acne or hirsutism than those without AGA (96.3% vs. 70.6%). Subjects with AGA were more likely to report concern with hair loss (70.4% vs. 37.7%); however, their BDI-FS scores were no different from subjects without AGA. There were no differences between subjects with and without AGA in biochemical hyperandrogenism or metabolic parameters.

Conclusion(s):

AGA is prevalent in 22% of subjects meeting diagnostic criteria for PCOS. AGA is associated with other manifestations of clinical hyperandrogenism, but not with greater risk of biochemical hyperandrogenemia or metabolic dysfunction than with PCOS alone.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(14)00033-8/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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