Impact of fresh versus cryopreserved testicular sperm upon intracytoplasmic sperm injection pregnancy outcomes in men with azoospermia due to spermatogenic dysfunction a meta analysis

After review and meta-analysis of the use of fresh versus cryopreserved sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection in azoospermic men with spermatogenic dysfunction, we found no difference in pregnancy or fertilization rates.

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Authors

Samuel Ohlander, M.D., James Hotaling, M.D., M.S., Eric Kirshenbaum, M.D., Craig Niederberger, M.D., F.A.C.S., Michael L. Eisenberg, M.D.

Volume 101, Issue 2, Pages 344-349, February 2014

Abstract

Objective:

To determine if clinical pregnancy rates and fertilization rates with the use of cryopreserved sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in patients with azoospermia due to spermatogenic dysfunction (i.e., nonobstructive azoospermia) are similar to those with fresh sperm.

Design:

Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Setting:

Academic medical center.

Patient(s):

Azoospermic men secondary to spermatogenic dysfunction.

Intervention(s):

Not applicable.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Clinical pregnancy rate, fertilization rate.

Result(s):

Eleven studies met criteria for the outcome of clinical pregnancy rate. Seventy-nine (28.7%) of 275 intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using fresh testicular sperm resulted in a clinical pregnancy, compared with 84 (28.1%) of 299 intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using cryopreserved sperm (relative risk [RR] 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75–1.33). Ten studies met criteria for the outcome of fertilization rate. A total of 1,422 (52.9%) of 2,687 oocytes injected with fresh testicular sperm were fertilized, compared with 1,490 (54.0%) of 2,757 oocytes injected with cryopreserved sperm (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92–1.02).

Conclusion(s):

In men with azoospermia due to spermatogenic dysfunction, there is no statistical difference between the use of fresh versus cryopreserved-thawed testicular sperm when assessing clinical pregnancy or fertilization rates in couples undergoing ICSI.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(13)03158-0/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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