Prospective evaluation of nighttime hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum

A third of women assessed prospectively during pregnancy and after delivery reported hot flashes during pregnancy/postpartum, for which depressive symptoms, lower education, and higher body mass index were predictors.

Like Comment

Authors

Rebecca C. Thurston, Ph.D., James F. Luther, M.A., Stephen R. Wisniewski, Ph.D., Heather Eng, B.A., Katherine L. Wisner, M.D., M.S.

Volume 100, Issue 6, Pages 1667-1672, December 2013

Abstract

Objective:

To determine the prevalence, course, and risk factors for nighttime hot flashes during the pregnancy and postpartum periods.

Design:

Clinical interview, physical measurements, and questionnaires administered at weeks 20, 30, and 36 of pregnancy and weeks 2, 12, 26, and 52 after delivery.

Setting:

Academic medical setting.

Patient(s):

429 women.

Intervention(s):

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Nighttime hot flashes.

Result(s):

Thirty-five percent of women reported nighttime hot flashes during pregnancy and 29% after delivery. In multivariable binomial mixed effects models, women who were younger (per year: odds ratio [OR] 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88–0.99), had a higher prepregnancy body mass index (per unit increase: OR 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01–1.10), and had less than a college education (OR 2.58; 95% CI, 1.19–5.60; vs. ≥college) were more likely to report nighttime hot flashes during pregnancy. Higher depressive symptoms were associated with nighttime hot flashes during pregnancy (per unit increase: OR 1.08; 95% CI, 1.04–1.13) and the postpartum period (OR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.14–1.25, multivariable models).

Conclusion(s):

Hot flashes, typically considered a menopausal symptom, were reported by over a third of women during pregnancy and/or the postpartum period. The predictors of these hot flashes, including depressive symptoms, low education, and higher body mass index are similar to those experienced during menopause. Future work should investigate the role of hormonal and affective factors in hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(13)02967-1/fulltext


Go to the profile of Fertility and Sterility

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

No comments yet.