In women the reproductive harm of toxins such as tobacco smoke is reversible in 6 months basis for the olive tree hypothesis

The authors discuss the “olive tree” metaphor, which emphasizes and helps promote the concept that reproductive damage done by environmental toxins such as tobacco smoke is not definitive.

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Authors

Dominique de Ziegler, M.D., Pietro Santulli, M.D., Alice Seroka, M.D., Christine Decanter, M.D., David R. Meldrum, M.D., Charles Chapron, M.D.

Volume 100, Issue 4, Pages 927-928, October 2013

Abstract

The authors discuss the “olive tree” metaphor, which emphasizes and helps promote the concept that reproductive damage done by environmental toxins such as tobacco smoke is not definitive.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(13)00653-5/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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