A common gene variant in STK11 is associated with metabolic risk markers and diabetes during gestation

In pregnant women, the G allele for the rs8111699 variant in STK11 is associated with a more favorable metabolic phenotype and may protect against the development of gestational diabetes mellitus, particularly in heavier women.

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Authors

Judit Bassols, Ph.D., Ana Megia, M.D., Pilar Soriano-Rodríguez, M.D., Marta Díaz, Ph.D., Anna Prats-Puig, Ph.D., Magdalena Gifre, R.N., Inmaculada Simón-Muela, M.D., Sara Torrent, M.D., Anna C. Borrell, M.D., Joan-Carles Riera-Socasau, M.D., Ph.D., Joan Vendrell, M.D., Ph.D., Francis de Zegher, M.D., Ph.D., Lourdes Ibáñez, M.D., Ph.D., Abel López-Bermejo, M.D.

Volume 100, Issue 3, Pages 788-792, September 2013

Abstract

Objective:

To assess whether the common rs8111699 (C528G) variant in STK11 is related to metabolic risk markers in pregnant women and to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Hospital.

Patient(s):

A total of 561 pregnant women: 318 without and 243 with GDM (National Diabetes Data Group criteria).

Intervention(s):

None.

Main Outcome Measures(s):

rs8111699 variant in STK11 (Taqman technology). Fasting glucose, insulin (homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and β-cell function [HOMA-IR and -β]) and C-peptide assessed at 24–28 weeks’ gestation.

Result(s):

In non-GDM women, the G allele in rs8111699 was associated with lower HOMA-IR (CC: 1.3 ± 0.1 mIU/L; GG: 0.9 ± 0.1 mIU/L) and HOMA-β (CC: 165 ± 20 mIU/L; GG: 118 ± 10 mIU/L). In GDM women, the G allele was related to lower body mass index (BMI; CC: 27.9 ± 1.0 kg/m2; GG: 24.5 ± 0.6 kg/m2) and C-peptide (CC: 2.3 ± 0.1 ng/mL; GG: 1.6 ± 0.1 ng/mL). The GG genotype was less frequently observed in GDM women (18% vs. 26%), particularly in heavier GDM women (BMI > median: 14% vs. 28%).

Conclusion(s):

In pregnant women, the G allele for the rs8111699 variant in STK11 is associated with a more favorable metabolic phenotype and may protect against the development of GDM, particularly in heavier women.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(13)00551-7/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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