Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents

Obesity was associated with PCOS in adolescents. Studies based on diagnosis codes only may underestimate the prevalence of PCOS and overestimate the magnitude of the association between obesity and PCOS.

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Authors

Shawna B. Christensen, M.S., Mary Helen Black, M.S., Ph.D., Ning Smith, M.S., Ph.D., Mayra M. Martinez, M.P.H., Steve J. Jacobsen, M.D., Ph.D., Amy H. Porter, M.D., Corinna Koebnick, M.S., Ph.D.

Volume 100, Issue 2, Pages 470-477, August 2013

Abstract

Objective:

To investigate the prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in adolescents and its association with obesity.

Design:

Cross-sectional study using electronic medical records.

Setting:

Not applicable.

Patient(s):

Adolescents aged 15–19 years (n = 137,502).

Intervention(s):

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

PCOS diagnosed or defined according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria.

Result(s):

The prevalence of a confirmed diagnosis of PCOS was 0.56%, which increased to 1.14% when undiagnosed cases with documented symptoms qualifying for PCOS according to NIH criteria were included. Compared with normal/underweight girls, the odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence interval [CI]) for confirmed PCOS diagnosis were 3.85 (3.04–4.88), 10.25 (8.16–12.84), and 23.10 (18.66–28.61) for overweight, moderately obese, and extremely obese adolescents, respectively, after adjusting for potential confounders. When adolescents with two or more supportive diagnoses were included (diagnosed and undiagnosed PCOS-NIH), the ORs (95% CI) for PCOS-NIH by weight class were significantly attenuated to 2.95 (2.53–3.44), 6.73 (5.78–7.83), and 14.65 (12.73–16.86) for overweight, moderately obese, and extremely obese adolescents, respectively.

Conclusion(s):

Overweight and obesity were associated with higher odds of PCOS in adolescents. Studies based solely on diagnosis codes may underestimate the prevalence of PCOS and overestimate the magnitude of the association between obesity and PCOS.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(13)00495-0/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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