Smoking and infertility A committee opinion

Smoking interferes with fertility of both males and females and can decrease the effectiveness of assisted reproductive technologies.

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The Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Volume 98, Issue 6, Pages 1400-1406, December 2012

Abstract

Approximately 30% of reproductive age women and 35% of reproductive age men in the United States smoke cigarettes. Substantial harmful effects of cigarette smoke on fecundity and reproduction have become apparent but are not generally appreciated. This document replaces the 2008 ASRM Practice Committee document of the same name.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)01954-1/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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