Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes in patients with Klinefelter syndrome A longitudinal observational study

The high prevalence of diabetes in Klinefelter patients is possibly due to abnormal karyotypes. Other risk factors, such as low T and high triglyceride, may also contribute to the development of diabetes.

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Authors

Mao Jiang-Feng, M.D., Xu Hong-Li, M.D., Wu Xue-Yan, M.D., Nie Min, M.D., Lu Shuang-Yu, M.D., Xiang Hong-Ding, M.D., Liao Liang-Ming, M.D.

Vol 98, Issue 5, Pages 1331-1335

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes in patients with Klinefelter syndrome.

Design:

Retrospective and longitudinal.

Setting:

Medical college hospital.

Patients:

Klinefelter group (n=39) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) group (n=40).

Interventions:

Testosterone replacement therapy.

Main Outcome Measures:

The metabolic parameters, lipid profiles and sex hormones were compared before and after testosterone replacement therapy. The median duration of follow-up was 4 and 5.2 years, respectively.

Results:

The prevalence of diabetes was 20.5% (8 of 39) in the Klinefelter group and 5% in the IHH group. In the Klinefelter group, the incidence of diabetes was 12.5% in patients with 47,XXY karyotype and 57.1% in patients with other atypical karyotypes, such as 46XY/47XXY chimera. In the Klinefelter group, the average (±SD) age at diagnosis of diabetes was 27.1 ± 4.5 years. Four subjects had diabetes before T therapy, and their blood glucose did not improve after T replacement. One patient had a history of acute pancreatitis. Two other subjects had very high triglyceride levels. During the follow-up, body weight increased more in Klinefelter patients than in IHH patients.

Conclusions:

The prevalence of diabetes is higher in Klinefelter patients than in IHH patients, possibly due to abnormal karyotypes. Other risk factors, such as low testosterone level, high body weight, acute pancreatitis and high triglyceride levels, may also contribute to the development of diabetes.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)01875-4/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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