Contribution of the rate of change of antimullerian hormone in estimating time to menopause for late reproductive age women

The rate of change of AMH is an independent predictor of TTM in late reproductive-age women and increased precision of estimates of TTM when included with baseline AMH levels and age.

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Authors

Ellen W. Freeman, Ph.D., Mary D. Sammel, Sc.D., Hui Lin, M.S., David W. Boorman, M.S., Clarisa R. Gracia, M.D.

Vol 98, Issue 5, Pages 1254-1259.e2

Abstract

Objective:

To determine the rate of change of antimullerian hormone (AMH) in the late reproductive years and its associations with time to menopause (TTM). We hypothesized that the rate of change between 2 measures of AMH reflects follicular atresia and varies among women independent of age.

Design:

A 14-year follow-up.

Setting:

A randomly identified, population-based cohort (Penn Ovarian Aging Study).

Subjects:

Two measures of AMH were evaluated in survival analysis of 293 women.

Intervention:

None.

Main Outcome Measure:

Time to menopause.

Results:

The rate of AMH change was a strong independent predictor of TTM in multivariable analysis after adjusting for AMH baseline, age and smoking (hazard ratio for 1 SD change = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.56 – 2.14, P

Conclusions:

AMH rate of change was independently associated with TTM in late reproductive-age women and increased the precision of estimates of TTM when included with an AMH baseline level and age. The rate of AMH change may be a more direct surrogate than age and increases the precision of estimates of TTM during this clinically important time period.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)01892-4/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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