The risk of gestational diabetes mellitus among Mexican women with a history of infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome

Pregnant Mexican women with a history of infertility and PCOS are at increased risk for developing GDM. This risk should be considered starting early in the second trimester for a timely intervention and to improve the maternal–fetal prognosis.

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Authors

Enrique Reyes-Muñoz, M.D., M.Sc., Guillermo Castellanos-Barroso, M.D., Brenda Y. Ramírez-Eugenio, M.D., Carlos Ortega-González, M.D., Adalberto Parra, M.D., Alfredo Castillo-Mora, M.D., Julio F. De la Jara-Díaz, M.D.

Vol 97, Issue 6 , Pages 1467-1471

Abstract

Objective:

To study the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Mexican women with a history of infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with women without PCOS matched by age, pregestational body mass index (BMI), and parity.

Design:

Historic cohort study.

Setting:

Level three medical institution.

Patient(s):

Group 1 (n = 52), women with a history of infertility and PCOS, and group 2 (n = 52), women without PCOS. Inclusion criteria were singleton pregnancy with ≤13 weeks of gestation. Exclusion criteria were pregestational diabetes mellitus and/or concomitant diseases.

Intervention(s):

Diagnosis of GDM was based on a 3-hour, 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) performed during the second trimester.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Incidence and relative risk (RR) for GDM.

Result(s):

The incidence of GDM was 26.9% and 9.6% for groups 1 and 2, respectively (RR = 2.8; 95% confidence interval 1.08–7.2). No other between-group differences were observed in the incidence of miscarriage, preterm birth, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia, stillbirth, fetal malformations, or small or large for gestational age newborns.

Conclusion(s):

Pregnant Mexican women with a history of infertility and PCOS are at increased risk for developing GDM. This risk should be considered beginning early in the second trimester for a timely intervention and to improve the maternal–fetal prognosis.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)00359-7/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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