The risk of gestational diabetes mellitus among Mexican women with a history of infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome

Pregnant Mexican women with a history of infertility and PCOS are at increased risk for developing GDM. This risk should be considered starting early in the second trimester for a timely intervention and to improve the maternal–fetal prognosis.

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Authors

Enrique Reyes-Muñoz, M.D., M.Sc., Guillermo Castellanos-Barroso, M.D., Brenda Y. Ramírez-Eugenio, M.D., Carlos Ortega-González, M.D., Adalberto Parra, M.D., Alfredo Castillo-Mora, M.D., Julio F. De la Jara-Díaz, M.D.

Vol 97, Issue 6 , Pages 1467-1471

Abstract

Objective:

To study the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Mexican women with a history of infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with women without PCOS matched by age, pregestational body mass index (BMI), and parity.

Design:

Historic cohort study.

Setting:

Level three medical institution.

Patient(s):

Group 1 (n = 52), women with a history of infertility and PCOS, and group 2 (n = 52), women without PCOS. Inclusion criteria were singleton pregnancy with ≤13 weeks of gestation. Exclusion criteria were pregestational diabetes mellitus and/or concomitant diseases.

Intervention(s):

Diagnosis of GDM was based on a 3-hour, 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) performed during the second trimester.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Incidence and relative risk (RR) for GDM.

Result(s):

The incidence of GDM was 26.9% and 9.6% for groups 1 and 2, respectively (RR = 2.8; 95% confidence interval 1.08–7.2). No other between-group differences were observed in the incidence of miscarriage, preterm birth, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia, stillbirth, fetal malformations, or small or large for gestational age newborns.

Conclusion(s):

Pregnant Mexican women with a history of infertility and PCOS are at increased risk for developing GDM. This risk should be considered beginning early in the second trimester for a timely intervention and to improve the maternal–fetal prognosis.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)00359-7/fulltext


Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders.