Comprehensive chromosome screening is highly predictive of the reproductive potential of human embryos: a prospective, blinded, nonselection study

This prospective, blinded, nonselection study is the first to determine the negative and positive predictive values of aneuploidy screening for clinical outcome. Results demonstrate that this CCS method can be safely used to discard embryos because they rarely possess significant reproductive potential.

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Authors

Richard T. Scott Jr., M.D., Kathleen Ferry, B.S., Jing Su, M.S., Xin Tao, M.S., Katherine Scott, M.S., Nathan R. Treff, Ph.D.

Volume 97, Issue 4, Pages 870-875

Abstract

Objective:

To determine both the negative and positive predictive values of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) results for clinical outcome.

Design:

Data obtained from two prospective, double-blinded, nonselection studies.

Setting:

Academic center for reproductive medicine.

Patient(s):

One hundred forty-six couples with a mean maternal age of 34.0 ± 4.4 years and a mean paternal age of 37.3 ± 5.8 years.

Intervention(s):

Embryo biopsy for DNA fingerprinting and aneuploidy assessment.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Failure rate of embryos predicted aneuploid by CCS (negative predictive value) and success rate of embryos predicted euploid by CCS (positive predictive value).

Result(s):

A total of 255 IVF-derived human embryos were cultured and selected for transfer without influence from CCS analysis. Embryos were biopsied before transfer, including 113 blastomeres at the cleavage stage and 142 trophectoderm biopsies at the blastocyst stage. Comprehensive chromosome screening was highly predictive of clinical outcome, with 96% of aneuploid predicted embryos failing to sustain implantation and 41% sustained implantation from embryos predicted to be euploid.

Conclusion(s):

These nonselection data provide the first prospective, blinded, clinical study directly measuring the predictive value of aneuploidy screening for clinical outcome. The clinical error rate of an aneuploidy designation is very low (4%), whereas implantation and delivery rates of euploid embryos are increased relative to the entire cohort of transferred embryos.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(12)00154-9/fulltext

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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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