Assisted conception does not increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus, compared with natural conception: a prospective cohort study

Assisted conception does not increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus com- pared with natural conception.

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Volume 111, Issue 2, Pages 348–356

Authors:

Rui Nie, Ph.D., Mingyue Wang, M.Med., Tantan Liao, M.Med., Kun Qian, Ph.D., Guijin Zhu, M.Med., Lei Jin, Ph.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To determine whether assisted conception increases the risk for mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection compared with natural conception.

Design

Prospective cohort study.

Setting

Research laboratory.

Patient(s)

A total of 305 children, 176 born with assisted conception and 129 born with natural conception, were born to a total of 251 hepatitis B surface antigen– (HBsAg-) positive women.

Intervention(s)

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s)

The seropositive rates of HBsAg in children at birth and HBV infection rates at 9–15 months of age.

Result(s)

Overall, 7.5% (23/305) of children were HBsAg-positive at birth. The rate of HBsAg-positive children at birth did not significantly differ between children in the assisted conception group compared with those in the natural conception group (6.3% [11/176] vs. 9.3% [12/129]). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that conception method is not related to the rate of HBsAg-positive children at birth. All children who were positive for HBsAg at birth and were followed up for 9–15 months became negative for HBsAg after hepatitis B immunization.

Conclusion(s)

Assisted conception does not increase the risk for mother-to-child transmission of HBV compared with natural conception.


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders.