Transfer of embryos with segmental mosaicism is associated with a significant reduction in live-birth rate

Transfer of segmental mosaic compared with euploid embryos results in a reduced live birth.

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Volume 111, Issue 1, Pages 69–76

Authors:

Temeka Zore, M.D., Lindsay L. Kroener, M.D., Chunmin Wang, Ph.D., Lian Liu, M.D., Richard Buyalos, M.D., Gary Hubert, M.D., Mousa Shamonki, M.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To evaluate the impact of segmental mosaicism on pregnancy outcomes from the transfer of embryos previously designated as euploid.

Design

Retrospective cohort analysis.

Setting

Single, private, high-volume fertility center.

Patient(s)

Three hundred and twenty-seven women who underwent 377 frozen single euploid embryo transfers.

Intervention(s)

Trophectoderm biopsy of embryos cultured to the blastocyst stage, where all transferred embryos were designated euploid by high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); after ascertaining all outcomes, revaluation of aCGH results for evidence of segmental mosaicism (defined as mosaicism on a portion of a chromosome).

Main Outcome Measure(s)

Live-birth rate and spontaneous abortion rate.

Result(s)

Of the 377 embryos transferred, 357 were euploid with no mosaicism, and 20 embryos had segmental mosaicism. Segmental mosaics had a statistically significantly lower live-birth rate compared with euploid controls (30.0% vs. 53.8%). When controlling for age and day of Trophectoderm biopsy, the odds for live birth after transfer of segmental mosaics were reduced by 66% compared with euploid controls (0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.92). The spontaneous abortion rate was statistically significantly higher after transfer of segmental mosaics compared with euploid controls (40.0% vs. 18.2%).

Conclusion(s)

Blastocysts with segmental mosaicism have reduced reproductive potential but retain the ability to result in live birth. These results support reporting segmental mosaicism to optimize selection of a single embryo for transfer that will maximize the chance of life birth.



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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. 

Comments

Go to the profile of Lee C Kao
over 2 years ago

what are the karyotypes of all the live births coming out of transfer of segmental mosaic embryos?