Development of an emergency plan for in vitro fertilization programs: a committee opinion

All IVF programs and clinics should have a plan to protect all specimens and provide contingencies for continuation or cessation of patient care following an emergency or natural disaster.

VOLUME 115, ISSUE 4, P870-873

Authors:

Practice Committees of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, and the Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists

Abstract:

All in vitro fertilization programs and clinics should have a plan to protect fresh and cryopreserved human specimens (embryos, oocytes, sperm) and to provide contingencies for continuation or cessation of patient care in the event of an emergency or natural disaster. This document replaces the document titled “Recommendations for development of an emergency plan for in vitro fertilization programs: a committee opinion,” last published in 2016 (Fertil Steril 2016;105:e11–3).

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Comments

Go to the profile of Kamil
3 months ago

Hello,
I have just read the article "Development of an emergency planfor in vitro fertilization programs: acommittee opinion". As a business continuity officer in an organization, I read the article with much curiosity. 
The guidelines for the safety of patients' lives and health and for securing data against loss are clear to me. 
However, the question arises about the security of embryos and germ cells stored in banks. Surveillance and emergency alert systems are great for responding to emergencies - although they do not always allow for an effective response. The element that worries me is that we are usually not able to predict in advance fires in buildings and other sudden natural disasters, building disasters, traffic accidents that will end in the destruction of a building and the loss of embryos. Does the business of infertility treatment have to assume in advance that the mentioned disasters are impossible to respond effectively and accept the indicated risks? 
In the following article: https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article/20/7/1751/2356476?login=false Mathew Tomlinson in his concluding remarks wrote: "For example, well-informed patients have even asked for their stored sperm to be placed in two separate geographic locations to reduce the risk of losses due to fire or other natural disaster." Can such solutions be successfully used to protect embryos stored in the banks of infertility clinics? Can diversification be measures to ensure the highest possible level of resilience to disruptions and disasters for the organization?

Best regards,

K.H.