Higher prevalence of chronic endometritis in women with endometriosis: a possible etiopathogenetic link

We observed a higher incidence of chronic endometritis diagnosed by histology and hysteroscopy in women with endometriosis compared with unaffected controls.

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Volume 108, Issue 2, Pages 289–295.e1

Authors:

Ettore Cicinelli, M.D., Giuseppe Trojano, M.D., Marcella Mastromauro, M.D., Antonella Vimercati, M.D., Marco Marinaccio, M.D., Paola Carmela Mitola, M.D., Leonardo Resta, M.D., Dominique de Ziegler, M.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To evaluate the association between endometriosis end chronic endometritis (CE) diagnosed by hysteroscopy, conventional histology, and immunohistochemistry.

Design

Case-control study.

Setting

University hospital.

Patient(s)

Women with and without endometriosis who have undergone hysterectomy.

Intervention(s)

Retrospective evaluation of 78 women who have undergone hysterectomy and were affected by endometriosis and 78 women without endometriosis.

Main Outcome Measure(s)

CE diagnosed based on conventional histology and immunohistochemistry with anti-syndecan-1 antibodies to identify CD138 cells.

Result(s)

The prevalence of CE was statistically significantly higher in the women with endometriosis as compared with the women who did not have endometriosis (33 of 78, 42.3% vs. 12 of 78, 15.4% according to hysteroscopy; and 30 of 78, 38.5% vs. 11 of 78, 14.1% according to histology). The women were divided into two groups, 115 patients without CE and 41 patients with CE. With univariate analysis, parity was associated with a lower risk for CE, and endometriosis was associated with a statistically significantly elevated risk of CE. Using multivariate analysis, parity continued to be associated with a lower incidence of CE, whereas endometriosis was associated with a 2.7 fold higher risk.

Conclusion(s)

The diagnosis of CE is more frequent in women with endometriosis. Although no etiologic relationships between CE and endometriosis can be established, this study suggests that CE should be considered and if necessary ruled out in women with endometriosis, particularly if they have abnormal uterine bleeding. Identification and appropriate treatment of CE may avoid unnecessary surgery.


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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