Zika virus detected in amniotic fluid and umbilical cord blood in an in vitro fertilization-conceived pregnancy in Venezuela

We discuss the detection of Zika virus and how it can cross the placental barrier and strengthen the association between Zika virus and cases of microcephaly and ventriculomegaly.

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Volume 107, Issue 6, Pages 1319–1322

Authors:

Isaac Benjamin, M.D., Gissel Fernández, M.D., José Valentin Figueira, M.D., Leticia Parpacén, M.D., María Teresa Urbina, M.Sc., Randolfo Medina, M.Sc.

Abstract:

Initial ultrasound findings in pregnancy may not be informative. Only at 21 weeks + 4 days of gestation did an ultrasound reveal fetal microcephaly and ventriculomegaly. Combined clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings provided a complete picture of the severe damage caused by Zika infection.


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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