Environmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and miscarriage

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals can be associated with an increase in miscarriage.

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Volume 106, Issue 4, Pages 941-947

Authors:

Sacha A. Krieg, M.D., Ph.D., Lora K. Shahine, M.D., Ruth B. Lathi, M.D.

Abstract:

Establishment of early pregnancy is the result of complex biochemical interactions between the decidua and blastocyst. Any alteration in this chemical dialogue has the potential to result in adverse pregnancy outcomes including miscarriage. Sporadic miscarriage is the most common complication of pregnancy and can be caused by multiple factors. While the most common cause of miscarriage is genetic abnormalities in the fetus, other contributing factors certainly can play a role in early loss. One such factor is environmental exposure, in particular to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, which has the potential to interfere with endogenous hormone action. These effects can be deleterious, especially in early pregnancy when the hormonal milieu surrounding implantation is in delicate balance. The purpose of this paper is to review the current evidence on the role of environmental toxins in reproduction.


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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