Evidence for bisphenol A-induced female infertility

We discuss how bisphenol A exposure may be associated with female infertility via a mechanism of action that is not fully elucidated.

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Volume 106, Issue 4, Pages 827-856

Authors:

Ayelet Ziv-Gal, Ph.D., Jodi A. Flaws, Ph.D.

Abstract:

We summarized the scientific literature published from 2007 to 2016 on the potential effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on female fertility. We focused on overall fertility outcomes (e.g., ability to become pregnant, number of offspring), organs that are important for female reproduction (i.e., oviduct, uterus, ovary, hypothalamus, and pituitary), and reproductive-related processes (i.e., estrous cyclicity, implantation, and hormonal secretion). The reviewed literature indicates that BPA may be associated with infertility in women. Potential explanations for this association can be generated from experimental studies. Specifically, BPA may alter overall female reproductive capacity by affecting the morphology and function of the oviduct, uterus, ovary, and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis in animal models. In addition, BPA may disrupt estrous cyclicity and implantation. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better understand the exact mechanisms of action and to detect potential reproductive toxicity at earlier stages.


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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