Relationship between paternal somatic health and assisted reproductive technology outcomes

Paternal medical comorbidity is associated with assisted reproductive technology outcomes including offspring characteristics.

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Volume 106, Issue 3, Pages 559-565

Authors:

Michael L. Eisenberg, M.D., Shufeng Li, B.S., Lauren A. Wise, Sc.D., Courtney D. Lynch, Ph.D., M.P.H., Steven Nakajima, M.D., Stuart A. Meyers, Ph.D., Barry Behr, Ph.D., Valerie L. Baker, M.D.

Abstract:

Objective

To study the association between paternal medical comorbidities and the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART).

Design

Retrospective cohort study.

Setting

Academic reproductive medicine center.

Patient(s)

We analyzed fresh ART cycles uszing freshly ejaculated sperm from the male partner of couples undergoing ART cycles from 2004 until 2014. We recorded patient and partner demographic characteristics. The cohort was linked to hospital billing data to obtain information on selected male partners' comorbidities identified using ICD-9-CM codes.

Intervention(s)

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s)

Fertilization, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, implantation, and live-birth rates as well as birth weights and gestational ages.

Result(s)

In all, we identified 2,690 men who underwent 5,037 fresh ART cycles. Twenty-seven percent of men had at least one medical diagnosis. Men with nervous system diseases had on average lower pregnancy rates (23% vs. 30%) and live-birth rates (15% vs. 23%) than men without nervous system diseases. Lower fertilization rates were also observed among men with respiratory diseases (61% vs. 64%) and musculoskeletal diseases (61% vs. 64%) relative to those without these diseases. In addition, men with diseases of the endocrine system had smaller children (2,970 vs. 3,210 g) than men without such diseases. Finally, men with mental disorders had children born at an earlier gestational age (36.5 vs. 38.0 weeks).

Conclusion(s)

The current report identified a possible relationship between a man's health history and IVF outcomes. As these are potentially modifiable factors, further research should determine whether treatment for men's health conditions may improve or impair IVF outcomes.


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

2 Comments

Go to the profile of Craig Niederberger
Craig Niederberger almost 3 years ago

This article was deservedly highlighted as an outstanding example of an important publication in his presentation at ASRM 2017 by Kurt Barnhart in his session  Medical Publishing’s Future: Video, Interactive Discussions, and Global Journal Clubs in the postgraduate course PC09: Scientific Manuscript Coaching: Maximizing Your Likelihood of Publication in Fertility and Sterility.

Go to the profile of Craig Niederberger
Craig Niederberger almost 3 years ago

This article was deservedly highlighted as an outstanding example of an important publication in his presentation at ASRM 2017 by Kurt Barnhart in his session  Medical Publishing’s Future: Video, Interactive Discussions, and Global Journal Clubs in the postgraduate course PC09: Scientific Manuscript Coaching: Maximizing Your Likelihood of Publication in Fertility and Sterility.