Introduction: Determinants of polycystic ovary syndrome

This issue’s Views and Reviews series furthers our understanding of the phenotyping and the environmental, genetic, and evolutionary determinants of polycystic ovary syndrome, assisting in elucidating the fundamental etiologies underlying this common and pervasive syndrome.

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Author

Ricardo Azziz, M.D., M.P.H.

Abstract

The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as one of the most common endocrine abnormalities of humans, with global prevalences so far generally 5%–15%. Overall, the disorder appears to be an ancient complex genetic trait, perhaps dating at least 50,000 years ago. The phenotype of PCOS can be subdivided into four different types. Phenotype A and B (hyperandrogenism + ovulatory dysfunction, with [A] and without [B] polycystic ovarian morphology [PCOM], respectively) can be considered to represent the “classic” form of the disorder. Phenotype C is the so-called “ovulatory” PCOS (hyperandrogenism + PCOM only). And phenotype D is often referred to as “nonhyperandrogenic” PCOS (ovulatory dysfunction + PCOM only). The different phenotypes vary in the degree to which they are associated with an increased risk for metabolic dysfunction and reproductive complications. There are a number of determinants of the epidemiology (prevalence) and presentation (phenotype) of PCOS, including environmental (e.g., socioeconomic, geographic, toxicologic, life-style, and dietary) and genetic (e.g., gene variants, epigenetic, and race/ethnicity) factors. Finally a better understanding of the evolutionary determinants of PCOS has the potential for providing additional insight into those factors determining the etiology, prevalence, and persistence of a disorder that appears to be, superficially at least, an evolutionary paradox.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(16)612...

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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