Lightening the burden of care in assisted reproductive technology

In our March 2016 Views and Reviews section, we discussed the large amount of data indicating that psychological stress reduces in vitro fertilization (IVF) success (1). We referred to a landmark study showing that increased diastolic blood pressure was highly predictive of poor IVF outcomes. I can identify with those findings. My diastolic pressure was over 90 during my internship and is now under 70. When my IVF program was first housed in the university, a patient would come back to my office completely unglued because the pharmacy had run out of gonadotropins.

Authors

David Roy Meldrum, M.D.

Volume 105, Issue 5, Pages 1144-1145

Abstract

In our March 2016 Views and Reviews section, we discussed the large amount of data indicating that psychological stress reduces in vitro fertilization (IVF) success (1). We referred to a landmark study showing that increased diastolic blood pressure was highly predictive of poor IVF outcomes. I can identify with those findings. My diastolic pressure was over 90 during my internship and is now under 70. When my IVF program was first housed in the university, a patient would come back to my office completely unglued because the pharmacy had run out of gonadotropins.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(16)30049-8/fulltext