Urinary paraben concentrations and in vitro fertilization outcomes among women from a fertility clinic

Among a prospective cohort of women undergoing in vitro fertilization treatments at an academic fertility center, urinary methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben concentrations were not associated with clinical in vitro fertilization outcomes.

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Authors

Lidia Mínguez-Alarcón, Ph.D., Yu-Han Chiu, M.D., Carmen Messerlian, Ph.D., Paige L. Williams, Ph.D., Mary E. Sabatini, Ph.D., Thomas L. Toth, M.D., Jennifer B. Ford, R.N., Antonia M. Calafat, Ph.D., Russ Hauser, M.D. for the EARTH Study Team

Volume 105, Issue 3, Pages 714-721

Abstract

Objective:

To explore the relationship between urinary paraben concentrations and IVF outcomes among women attending an academic fertility center.

Design:

Prospective cohort study.

Setting:

Fertility clinic in a hospital setting.

Patient(s):

A total of 245 women contributing 356 IVF cycles.

Intervention(s):

None. Quantification of urinary concentrations of parabens by isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry, and assessment of clinical endpoints of IVF treatments abstracted from electronic medical records at the academic fertility center.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Total and mature oocyte counts, proportion of high-quality embryos, fertilization rates, and rates of implantation, clinical pregnancy, and live births.

Result(s):

The geometric means of the urinary concentrations of methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben in our study population were 133, 24, and 1.5 μg/L, respectively. In models adjusted for age, body mass index, race/ethnicity, smoking status, and primary infertility diagnosis, urinary methylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben concentrations were not associated with IVF outcomes, specifically total and mature oocyte counts, proportion of high embryo quality, and fertilization rates. Moreover, no significant associations were found between urinary paraben concentrations and rates of implantation, clinical pregnancy, and live births.

Conclusion(s):

Urinary paraben concentrations were not associated with IVF outcomes among women undergoing infertility treatments.

Read the full text at: http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282(15)02104-4/fulltext


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Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Office, American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Fertility and Sterility® is an international journal for obstetricians, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, urologists, basic scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. The journal publishes juried original scientific articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause. Fertility and Sterility® encourages and supports meaningful basic and clinical research, and facilitates and promotes excellence in professional education, in the field of reproductive medicine.

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